GBAGADA EXPRESS

GBAGADA EXPRESS

gbagada express by NCR

The Alte world or movement is a relatively new but fast-growing one as it fits into the “Gen z” orientation of rebellion and independence. It is built on the foundation of self-expression and individualism. As a genre, it’s a combination of various sounds spiced with the unexplainable alte vibe. Afro-fusion, pop, a comfortable tempo R and b, and that extra something. To perfectly put it in words would be a tall reach but this cliche perfectly explains it

You feel it and you just hear it.

The multifaceted form gives the artists the avenue to experiment using other genres and spin it into the Alte form.

In the Nigerian sphere, BOJ has been adorned as the father of the Nigerian Alte music style. On his most recent album, he reminds us of his greatness. A cursory look at the track list slightly amped the expectation for me and it didn’t disappoint. The gift that literally keeps on giving. The album oozes a sense of completion; the features and the singles in a perfect blend. Each beat was owned and delivered with masterful dexterity.

The aura from the album seems heavily dependent on the cultural mix of Boj’s background of British and Nigerian heritage. International sounds spiced with Nigeria Alte pepperoni. The perfect example has to be Lekki love featuring BNXN. The beat clearly sampled from California Girls by Nombe but the tempo and spacing were adjusted and a lot more elements were added. Addressing similar themes, the track is a beautiful delivery.

The album is also beautified with a huge presence of strings- bass, lead, and acoustic. The soft plucking raises its head in every song and dictates the sweet softness that broods over the album. It’s no wonder that the first voice we hear from a Guitar filled album is Fireboy. Fireboy has enjoyed great success from the strings and he repeated the same on the opening track

Each artist featured came ready to feast Buju, Davido, and Eazi on Abracadabra which is one of the faster songs on the album, Wizkid on Awolowo (having nothing to do with the legendary Western leader )

Tinu Ewe which takes a page from the folktale with a songbook is a cultural phenom popular to the indigenes who have stories spiced with songs. The simplicity of those songs keeps¬† ¬†the audience engaged and involved. Tinu Ewe teaches absolutely no morals. From the beginning, it was pretty clear this wasn’t going that way. It addresses themes of molly, and jedi jedi.

Get out the way -the drill song in which he portrays himself as an unstoppable force.

On Awolowo with Another of the big 3 who’s a master of the sensual and his tendency to fill tracks with words with questionable lyrical meaning. It however achieves the said purpose.

A wide range of songs keeps on giving varying forms and all round vibesss.

Thank you.

Whitelion!

Oche Echioda

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